SIRE 2.0: Overview and adaptation

SIRE 2.0 will provide more accurate information to enable OCIMF members and programme recipients to make judgements on the quality and the likely future performance of a vessel. It is expected to become operational in Q4 2022.

The Ship Inspection Report Programme (SIRE) is one of the most significant safety initiatives introduced by OCIMF. Essentially, SIRE is a very large database of up-to-date information with the focus on tanker quality and ship safety standards.

As the industry continues to evolve, OCIMF has decided in 2017 to develop SIRE 2.0, an enhanced and risk-based vessel inspection programme that will supersede the existing SIRE programme. SIRE 2.0 will provide more accurate information to enable OCIMF members and programme recipients to make judgments on the quality and the likely future performance of a vessel. It is expected to become operational in Q4 2022.

How will SIRE 2.0 work?

- What documents are needed? 

In the present SIRE system, there are two documents that must be provided by the operator prior to inspection: An up to date harmonized vessel particulars questionnaire (HVPQ) and a crew matrix. In SIRE 2.0, there are four documents needed:

  • Harmonized vessel particulars questionnaire (HVPQ)
  • Pre-inspection questionnaire: This is expected to be an online questionnaire completed by the vessel operator providing information about the vessel and supplementing HVPQ. This might include crew matrix and details of internal and external audits carried out on the vessel such as ISM audit, navigation audit, TSI report, etc.
  • Certificates: The operator will be required to upload copies of all the vessels’ certificates and keep them up to update, such as after class surveys. 
  • Photographs: A representative and standardized set of photographs of the vessel must be uploaded. To be refreshed at around 6 months intervals or when any materials changed in the vessel.

- How will the new question set be graded?

A bespoke, risk-based vessel inspection questionnaire will be generated using bow-tie methodology. Questions will cover these four key areas:

Inspection questionnaire compiler and risk prioritization of questions
  • Core: A minimum question set required to meet the fundamental assessment criteria of the vessel type. These questions are related to significant risks on board a vessel as defined by OCIMF.
  • Rotational: An algorithm will assign the non-core questions embedded into the inspection program. These questions may be allocated over several inspections of the same vessel but the order can’t be predicted.   
  • Conditional: Vessel specific questions based on available data on the vessel, its operator, or the ship type such as an aspect of the vessel’s operational history.
  • Campaign: Time limited questions covering an area of specific focus in response to incidents or an industry trend. It might be similar to the campaigns used by port state control organizations targeting specific areas of a vessel and its management for a

- What about the human element?

A core element of SIRE 2.0 takes a human centered approach which will provide a defined process to uncover systemic issues that might lead to risks. The human centered approach will take into the consideration of the physical, psychological, and social factors that affect human interaction with equipment, process and with other people. 

This is achieved by assessing Performance Influencing Factors (PIF). Inspectors will be prepared with a human response toolkit. For each question which is associated with Performance Influencing Factors, the inspector will be asked to provide objective responses to nine areas. These areas cover a variety of factors relating to human errors such as accessibility and usefulness of procedures, human- machine interfaces or the opportunity to learn or practice. 

- What is the technology involved?

Instead of a static questionnaire with yes/no answers, SIRE 2.0 inspections will be conducted in digital format, in real-time, with inspectors completing a Compiled Vessel Inspection Questionnaire (CVIQ) using a tablet device. This aims to improve the overall quality of the inspection report and also increase the assurance of data. The tablet system will also record all interactions such as auto-logging of start and finish times and auto-submission of inspection reports via inbuilt GPS tracking.

- How will the inspection be conducted then?

The inspector will carry out a document review prior to boarding by checking all the certificates and information given in the PIQ, certificates, etc. The time for onboard inspection is fixed at eight hours. All the questions are allocated a period of time for the inspector to review the item in question and write their answer. The format of the CVIQ will be entirely different to the present VIQ7 format. It will be compiled specifically for that ship on that occasion for that inspection. Human and process deficiencies may be linked to TMSA KPIs. The onboard document review will be a brief sample review to confirm the certificates uploaded are correct. The inspector must validate the photos posted by the operator and take their own photos, particularly for observations. Also if an operator photograph is not truly representative then the inspector may take a photo of the same scene. All questions must be answered during the course of the inspection such that the report is largely complete before the inspector leaves the vessel. The time period for the operator responses to the observations may be reduced from 14 calendar days to seven working days. 

Easing into SIRE 2.0 

SIRE 2.0 will require adaptation to a new system from both crews and the management level. This is a learning process, and might add more workload. To reduce complexity and time pressure, preparation is required so that standards can be met as easily as possible during the operational process.

Kaiko Systems accompanies crews and tech teams to adapt to the new regime via a simple interface. With Kaiko Systems, crews are guided to perform tasks while collecting data on the go through a mobile device. This not only ensures to meet all standards but also removes uncertainties on the job.

When the inspection is completed, the system can automatically sort, push and upload pictures. This helps to save manual work and reduce human error. In addition, the platform is also a dynamic management tool. For instance, intervals can be adjusted easily and reports can be customized. Thus, adapting to SIRE 2.0 will become faster and easier.

SIRE 2.0: Overview and adaptation

The Ship Inspection Report Programme (SIRE) is one of the most significant safety initiatives introduced by OCIMF. Essentially, SIRE is a very large database of up-to-date information with the focus on tanker quality and ship safety standards.

As the industry continues to evolve, OCIMF has decided in 2017 to develop SIRE 2.0, an enhanced and risk-based vessel inspection programme that will supersede the existing SIRE programme. SIRE 2.0 will provide more accurate information to enable OCIMF members and programme recipients to make judgments on the quality and the likely future performance of a vessel. It is expected to become operational in Q4 2022.

How will SIRE 2.0 work?

- What documents are needed? 

In the present SIRE system, there are two documents that must be provided by the operator prior to inspection: An up to date harmonized vessel particulars questionnaire (HVPQ) and a crew matrix. In SIRE 2.0, there are four documents needed:

  • Harmonized vessel particulars questionnaire (HVPQ)
  • Pre-inspection questionnaire: This is expected to be an online questionnaire completed by the vessel operator providing information about the vessel and supplementing HVPQ. This might include crew matrix and details of internal and external audits carried out on the vessel such as ISM audit, navigation audit, TSI report, etc.
  • Certificates: The operator will be required to upload copies of all the vessels’ certificates and keep them up to update, such as after class surveys. 
  • Photographs: A representative and standardized set of photographs of the vessel must be uploaded. To be refreshed at around 6 months intervals or when any materials changed in the vessel.

- How will the new question set be graded?

A bespoke, risk-based vessel inspection questionnaire will be generated using bow-tie methodology. Questions will cover these four key areas:

Inspection questionnaire compiler and risk prioritization of questions
  • Core: A minimum question set required to meet the fundamental assessment criteria of the vessel type. These questions are related to significant risks on board a vessel as defined by OCIMF.
  • Rotational: An algorithm will assign the non-core questions embedded into the inspection program. These questions may be allocated over several inspections of the same vessel but the order can’t be predicted.   
  • Conditional: Vessel specific questions based on available data on the vessel, its operator, or the ship type such as an aspect of the vessel’s operational history.
  • Campaign: Time limited questions covering an area of specific focus in response to incidents or an industry trend. It might be similar to the campaigns used by port state control organizations targeting specific areas of a vessel and its management for a

- What about the human element?

A core element of SIRE 2.0 takes a human centered approach which will provide a defined process to uncover systemic issues that might lead to risks. The human centered approach will take into the consideration of the physical, psychological, and social factors that affect human interaction with equipment, process and with other people. 

This is achieved by assessing Performance Influencing Factors (PIF). Inspectors will be prepared with a human response toolkit. For each question which is associated with Performance Influencing Factors, the inspector will be asked to provide objective responses to nine areas. These areas cover a variety of factors relating to human errors such as accessibility and usefulness of procedures, human- machine interfaces or the opportunity to learn or practice. 

- What is the technology involved?

Instead of a static questionnaire with yes/no answers, SIRE 2.0 inspections will be conducted in digital format, in real-time, with inspectors completing a Compiled Vessel Inspection Questionnaire (CVIQ) using a tablet device. This aims to improve the overall quality of the inspection report and also increase the assurance of data. The tablet system will also record all interactions such as auto-logging of start and finish times and auto-submission of inspection reports via inbuilt GPS tracking.

- How will the inspection be conducted then?

The inspector will carry out a document review prior to boarding by checking all the certificates and information given in the PIQ, certificates, etc. The time for onboard inspection is fixed at eight hours. All the questions are allocated a period of time for the inspector to review the item in question and write their answer. The format of the CVIQ will be entirely different to the present VIQ7 format. It will be compiled specifically for that ship on that occasion for that inspection. Human and process deficiencies may be linked to TMSA KPIs. The onboard document review will be a brief sample review to confirm the certificates uploaded are correct. The inspector must validate the photos posted by the operator and take their own photos, particularly for observations. Also if an operator photograph is not truly representative then the inspector may take a photo of the same scene. All questions must be answered during the course of the inspection such that the report is largely complete before the inspector leaves the vessel. The time period for the operator responses to the observations may be reduced from 14 calendar days to seven working days. 

Easing into SIRE 2.0 

SIRE 2.0 will require adaptation to a new system from both crews and the management level. This is a learning process, and might add more workload. To reduce complexity and time pressure, preparation is required so that standards can be met as easily as possible during the operational process.

Kaiko Systems accompanies crews and tech teams to adapt to the new regime via a simple interface. With Kaiko Systems, crews are guided to perform tasks while collecting data on the go through a mobile device. This not only ensures to meet all standards but also removes uncertainties on the job.

When the inspection is completed, the system can automatically sort, push and upload pictures. This helps to save manual work and reduce human error. In addition, the platform is also a dynamic management tool. For instance, intervals can be adjusted easily and reports can be customized. Thus, adapting to SIRE 2.0 will become faster and easier.

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